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Foreign Journalists On Parallels Between Trump's Candidacy, European Politics11:05
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The stage is left empty after Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus left the stage during protests on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)
The stage is left empty after Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus left the stage during protests on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)
This article is more than 4 years old.

There are about 15,000 journalists at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, including many foreign correspondents.

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with James Andre, senior correspondent for France 24; Marc Bassets, U.S. correspondent for El País; and Gary O’Donoghue, Washington correspondent for the BBC for their views on the convention and the election.

Hear more of Here & Now's coverage from the Republican National Convention.

Follow the Here & Now election road trip on Tumblr.

Robin Young speaks with foreign journalists James Andre, Marc Bassets, and Gary O’Donoghue. (Jill Ryan/Here & Now)
Robin Young speaks with foreign journalists James Andre, Marc Bassets, and Gary O’Donoghue. (Jill Ryan/Here & Now)

Interview Highlights: James André, Marc Bassets, and Gary O'Donoghue

On Britain’s reaction to Trump:

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Garry O’Donoghue: "Of course, Britain has been involved in its own political soap opera for the last few months with Brexit, and the exit of one prime minister, and the chaos in the Labour opposition party, so nothing really surprises, but there is a fascination with Donald Trump in Britain. More than half a million people signed a petition trying to stop him coming to the country, which ended up even potentially getting talked about in Parliament. So yeah, there's an absolute fascination, but I think there’s a recognition too that he has tapped into something that is not just a phenomenon in the United States. This anti-political sentiment is present in Britain. It’s present in Spain. It’s present everywhere. It’s something that people are struggling to understand and also fascinated with at the same time."

On whether some Europeans identify with Donald Trump:

Marc Bassets: "I think that in Europe, there are a lot of movement and politicians which have points in common with Donald Trump. Donald Trump is a very, is seen from the outside as an American phenomenon. Only in America can someone like Donald Trump can get to be a candidate for presidency. But it’s also a global phenomenon with many points in common with the National Front in France, in some aspects with the Brexit movement. With populist movements, left and right in Spain as well, which are tapping into the fears of globalization for instance. Also, right-wing movements who are using stoking fears about immigration. In this sense, Trump is very American, but also very European."

It’s also a global phenomenon with many points in common with the National Front in France, in some aspects with the Brexit movement. With populist movements, left and right in Spain as well, which are tapping into the fears of globalization for instance...In this sense, Trump is very American, but also very European.

Marc Bassets

How are people in France viewing the Trump candidacy?

James André: "People are very surprised at the result, that Trump is being nominated right now. The fact of the matter is we have a very large Muslim community in France, and it’s true that it’s been a real challenge over the past few months. We’ve had November 13, the attack on the Bataclan in Paris, now we have Nice just a few days ago. Despite all that, people are still shocked at the idea that you could ban Muslims from the United States as Donald Trump has said it, until you figure things out. That’s another shocker in a way. It’s a very unclear statement."

"We’re trying in France right now, politicians are trying to bind society together. They’ve realized that the whole point is to destroy the French society, to break it into two parts, Muslims and non-Muslims, and they’re trying to prevent that. It’s true that seeing this kind of rhetoric, here in the United States, from Donald Trump is kind-of shocking to part of the audience in France, but on the other hand, it’s important to remember we have Marine Le Pen. She’s also tapping into that sentiment, but she would probably not go that far."

We’re trying in France right now, politicians are trying to bind society together. They’ve realized that the whole point is to destroy the French society, to break it into two parts, Muslims and non-Muslims, and they’re trying to prevent that.

James André

Guests

James André, senior correspondent for France 24. He tweets @JamesAndreF24.

Marc Bassets, U.S. correspondent for El País. He tweets @marcbassets.

Gary O’Donoghue, Washington correspondent for the BBC. He tweets @BBCBlindGazza.

This segment aired on July 20, 2016.

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