Costume-Clad Veggies Could Be More Appealing To Kids, Study Finds05:19
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Super Sprowtz characters Brian Broccoli, Erica Eggplant and Colby Carrot. (Courtesy Super Sprowtz via Facebook)
Super Sprowtz characters Brian Broccoli, Erica Eggplant and Colby Carrot. (Courtesy Super Sprowtz via Facebook)
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Are vegetables the victims of bad marketing? Is it possible that simply dressing up a zucchini as a surfer dude will get kids to eat more zucchini?

A study recently published in the journal Pediatrics says yes. And if you play videos and display banners about him — and his carrot and sweet pea friends — you can increase kids' visits to the salad bar by a whopping 240 percent.

Here's a video about Super Sprowtz, an organization that turned vegetables into a cast of superhero characters to teach children about nutrition:

The study was conducted by researchers at the Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition at Cornell University. Professor Drew Hanks is its lead author.

Hanks is now a professor of consumer sciences at Ohio State University, and he joins Here & Now's Robin Young to discuss the implications of his research.

A composite image of food carts featuring banners showing vegetables as superhero-like characters. (Courtesy Drew Hanks)
A composite image of food carts featuring banners showing vegetables as superhero-like characters. (Courtesy Drew Hanks)

Guest

Drew Hanks, assistant professor of consumer sciences at Ohio State University.

This segment aired on August 31, 2016.

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