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As Karimov Regime Ends, What Happens Now In Uzbekistan?

Uzbek President Islam Karimov takes part in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier by the Kremlin Wall in Moscow, on April 26, 2016. (Sergei Karpukhin/AFP/Getty Images)
Uzbek President Islam Karimov takes part in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier by the Kremlin Wall in Moscow, on April 26, 2016. (Sergei Karpukhin/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Note: This BBC interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

Funeral services were held over the weekend for Islam Karimov, the 78-year-old former president of Uzbekistan. He ruled the central Asian nation for nearly three decades.

His regime was described as one of the most brutal to emerge out of the collapse of the Soviet Union. One of his daughters was believed to be his successor, but it's believed she's under house arrest.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with the BBC's Hamid Ismailov.

Guest

Hamid Ismailov, head of the BBC central Asian service and former BBC World Service writer in residence. He tweets @ismailov_writer.

This segment aired on September 7, 2016. The audio for this segment is not available.

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