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Facing TSA Trouble, State Lawmakers Scramble To Comply With REAL ID Act05:39
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A U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agent checks the identification and boarding pass of a passenger as she passes through security in the terminal at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va., Nov. 6, 2010. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
A U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agent checks the identification and boarding pass of a passenger as she passes through security in the terminal at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va., Nov. 6, 2010. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 3 years old.

More than a decade after Congress passed the REAL ID Act, four states are still not compliant with the law, which establishes new minimum security standards for state-issued IDs. Several additional states have received "limited extensions" on complying with the law from the Department of Homeland Security. Beginning in January 2018, their residents could need an alternative ID, like a passport or military ID, to board domestic flights or access federal facilities and nuclear power plants.

Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd speaks with Jill Cohenour, a Democratic state senator from Montana who has proposed a bill to make her state compliant with the REAL ID Act, despite longstanding concerns about civil liberties and the cost of implementation.

This article was originally published on April 04, 2017.

This segment aired on April 4, 2017.

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