A Year After Supreme Court Victory, Whole Woman's Health Clinic Reopens In Texas09:08
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Amy Hagstrom Miller, founder of Whole Woman's Health, a Texas women's health clinic that provides abortions, rejoices as she leaves the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 27, 2016, as the justices struck down the strict Texas anti-abortion restriction law known as HB2. The justices voted 5-3 in favor of Texas clinics that had argued the regulations were a thinly veiled attempt to make it harder for women to get an abortion in the nation's second-most populous state. The case is Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)
Amy Hagstrom Miller, founder of Whole Woman's Health, a Texas women's health clinic that provides abortions, rejoices as she leaves the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 27, 2016, as the justices struck down the strict Texas anti-abortion restriction law known as HB2. The justices voted 5-3 in favor of Texas clinics that had argued the regulations were a thinly veiled attempt to make it harder for women to get an abortion in the nation's second-most populous state. The case is Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)
This article is more than 2 years old.

Three years after it closed down, Whole Woman's Health clinic in Austin, Texas, has reopened its doors.

Whole Woman's Health was one of the two dozen clinics that had to close in Texas after the state passed House Bill 2 in 2013. The law put severe restrictions on abortion providers. But the Supreme Court struck down the law in June 2016, saying it put an undue burden on a woman's right to have an abortion.

Here & Now's Robin Young talks with one of the plaintiffs in that case, Amy Hagstrom Miller (@AmyHM), the founder and CEO of Whole Woman's Health, about her decision to reopen the Austin clinic.

This segment aired on May 1, 2017.

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