As Climate Change Looms, How To Keep National Flood Insurance Program Afloat09:28
Download

Play
Residents walk through flood water and past a stalled ambulance in the  aftermath of Superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (Charles Sykes/AP)
Residents walk through flood water and past a stalled ambulance in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (Charles Sykes/AP)
This article is more than 2 years old.

Homeowners in coastal communities are bracing for an increase in flooding as seas rise due to global warming. Already, the National Flood Insurance Program — which helps homeowners rebound from flood damage — is nearly $25 billion in debt. Much of that was racked up after paying for the damage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and Superstorm Sandy in 2012.

Congress is required to reauthorize the program every five years, and its next deadline is the end of September. Here & Now's Robin Young discusses proposed fixes to the program with Rob Moore (@RobMooreNRDC), a senior policy analyst at the Natural Resources Defense Council.

This segment aired on July 19, 2017.

Related:

Support the news

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news