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How To Watch Wednesday's Super Blue Blood Moon03:42
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In this Aug. 28, 2007, file photo, the moon takes on different orange tones during a lunar eclipse seen from Mexico City. During a lunar eclipse, the moon's disk can take on a colorful appearance from bright orange to blood red to dark brown and, rarely, very dark gray. On Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2018, a super moon, blue moon and a lunar eclipse will coincide for first time since 1982 and will not occur again until 2037. (Marco Ugarte/AP)
In this Aug. 28, 2007, file photo, the moon takes on different orange tones during a lunar eclipse seen from Mexico City. During a lunar eclipse, the moon's disk can take on a colorful appearance from bright orange to blood red to dark brown and, rarely, very dark gray. On Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2018, a super moon, blue moon and a lunar eclipse will coincide for first time since 1982 and will not occur again until 2037. (Marco Ugarte/AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Three celestial events will unfold Wednesday morning in North American skies, especially for the West Coast and Pacific Rim. The combination of events — a supermoon, blue moon and total lunar eclipse, known as a blood moon — will be the first of its kind since 1982.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Kelly Beatty (@NightSkyGuy), senior editor at Sky & Telescope magazine, about when and where to get the best view.

This segment aired on January 30, 2018.

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