East Africa Embraces China's 'Belt And Road' For Future Investment07:52
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The SGR cargo train rides from the port containers depot in Mombasa, Kenya, to Nairobi, Tuesday, May 30, 2017. Kenya's president Uhuru Kenyatta opened the country's largest infrastructure project since independence, a Chinese-backed railway costing nearly $3.3 billion that eventually will link a large part of East Africa to a major port on the Indian Ocean as China seeks to increase trade and influence. (Khalil Senosi/AP)
The SGR cargo train rides from the port containers depot in Mombasa, Kenya, to Nairobi, Tuesday, May 30, 2017. Kenya's president Uhuru Kenyatta opened the country's largest infrastructure project since independence, a Chinese-backed railway costing nearly $3.3 billion that eventually will link a large part of East Africa to a major port on the Indian Ocean as China seeks to increase trade and influence. (Khalil Senosi/AP)

Last year Kenyans celebrated the reopening of the Standard Gauge Railway, a train line between Mombasa and Nairobi originally built by British colonists but replaced by a Chinese construction company. The symbolism of that project was not lost on East Africans, who have seen an influx of Chinese money into the region as part of China's global infrastructure initiative known as "Belt and Road."

While some have welcomed the new investment, China's increasing involvement in Africa has also raised concerns of neocolonialism.

Our series on China's "Belt and Road" concludes as Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with James Shikwati (@ShikwatiJames), an economist and director of the Inter Region Economic Network in Nairobi.

This segment aired on February 16, 2018.

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