Advertisement

Cohen Raid Prompts Deeper Look At Attorney-Client Privilege04:34
Download

Play
President Trump's longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen (left) exits a New York court on April 16, 2018 in New York City. Trump's lawyers asked a federal judge to temporarily block prosecutors from reviewing files seized by the FBI from Cohen's offices and hotel room earlier this month. Trump's lawyers have argued that many of the documents are protected by attorney-client privilege. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
President Trump's longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen (left) exits a New York court on April 16, 2018 in New York City. Trump's lawyers asked a federal judge to temporarily block prosecutors from reviewing files seized by the FBI from Cohen's offices and hotel room earlier this month. Trump's lawyers have argued that many of the documents are protected by attorney-client privilege. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
This article is more than 2 years old.

An FBI raid earlier this month turned up boxes of documents from Michael Cohen, President Trump's personal lawyer. Now a judge has to determine which documents fall under attorney-client privilege and can't be used in court.

Here & Now's Eric Westervelt (@Ericnpr) speaks with Stephen Gillers, a law professor at New York University, for more on what the legal standard is.

This segment aired on April 24, 2018.

Related:

Advertisement

Advertisement