What New Legislation Could Mean For Foster Care In The U.S.10:48
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Whitney Duncan holds her daughter, Deklyn, 3, while visiting her at the home she's staying at with her grandmother in Jasper, Ga., Monday, June 26, 2017. Duncan and her husband were given a choice after failing a drug screening in 2016; lose their daughter to foster care or temporarily give her to a family member while they enter the county's two-year family drug court program to help with their opioid addiction. (David Goldman/AP)MoreCloseclosemore
Whitney Duncan holds her daughter, Deklyn, 3, while visiting her at the home she's staying at with her grandmother in Jasper, Ga., Monday, June 26, 2017. Duncan and her husband were given a choice after failing a drug screening in 2016; lose their daughter to foster care or temporarily give her to a family member while they enter the county's two-year family drug court program to help with their opioid addiction. (David Goldman/AP)

There are about 400,000 kids in foster care in the U.S. For many, it's not a short-term proposition. For the first time, federal reimbursement will be available to states that provide foster care services, after President Trump signed into law the Family First Prevention Services Act, aimed at keeping children with their families and not in foster care.

Here & Now's Robin Young takes a closer look with Hope Cooper (@hopecooper), founding partner of the True North Group, a Washington-based public policy consultancy group.

This segment aired on May 31, 2018.

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