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Climate Change Debate And Denial Dates Back Further Than You Might Think09:53
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In this Thursday, July 26, 2018 file photo, a structure burns as the Carr fire races along Highway 299 near Redding, Calif. In the last year, fires have devastated neighborhoods in the Northern California wine country city of Santa Rosa, the Southern California beach city of Ventura and, now, the inland city of Redding. Hotter weather from changing climates is drying out vegetation, creating more intense fires that spread quickly from rural areas to city subdivisions, climate and fire experts say. But they also blame cities for expanding into previously undeveloped areas susceptible to fire. (Noah Berger/AP)
In this Thursday, July 26, 2018 file photo, a structure burns as the Carr fire races along Highway 299 near Redding, Calif. In the last year, fires have devastated neighborhoods in the Northern California wine country city of Santa Rosa, the Southern California beach city of Ventura and, now, the inland city of Redding. Hotter weather from changing climates is drying out vegetation, creating more intense fires that spread quickly from rural areas to city subdivisions, climate and fire experts say. But they also blame cities for expanding into previously undeveloped areas susceptible to fire. (Noah Berger/AP)
This article is more than 1 year old.

Although climate change is still a relatively new phrase to many, its debate and denial in the U.S. stretches back a long time.

Here & Now's Robin Young talks about the history of climate change with Brian Balogh (@historyfellow) and Nathan Connolly (@ndbconnolly), historians and co-hosts of the podcast "BackStory," which is produced at Virginia Humanities.

This segment aired on August 16, 2018.

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