Advertisement

Unhoused People — And Some Developers — See Advantages In California's Project Homekey06:06
Download

Play
Tents for the homeless line a sidewalk in Los Angeles, California on December 17, 2019. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images)
Tents for the homeless line a sidewalk in Los Angeles, California on December 17, 2019. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images)

One tool to help with the homelessness crisis in California is gaining traction.

Project Homekey buys up old motels and hotels and turns them into long-term housing for people experiencing homelessness.

Unhouse people have already begun moving into the first projects. And service providers and low-income property developers see advantages in the program.

Here & Now's Tonya Mosley speaks with Saul Gonzalez, co-host of KQED's "The California Report."

Veronica Marmion outside of her Project Homekey motel room in Los Angeles. She is grateful to be off the streets after being unhoused and could see herself living there for at least a year. (Saul Gonzalez/KQED)
Veronica Marmion outside of her Project Homekey motel room in Los Angeles. She is grateful to be off the streets after being unhoused and could see herself living there for at least a year. (Saul Gonzalez/KQED)
A converted motel in Los Angeles' El Sereno neighborhood provides housing for 40 people. (Saul Gonzalez/KQED)
A converted motel in Los Angeles' El Sereno neighborhood provides housing for 40 people. (Saul Gonzalez/KQED)

This segment aired on May 28, 2021.

Related:

Advertisement

Advertisement