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Black girls left behind by Title IX: One coach trying to level the playing field explains why10:52
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From right to left, Simone Manuel of the United States, Cate Campbell of Australia and Francesca Halsall of Great Britain compete in the Women's 50m Freestyle heat on Day 7 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on Aug. 12, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Adam Pretty/Getty Images)
From right to left, Simone Manuel of the United States, Cate Campbell of Australia and Francesca Halsall of Great Britain compete in the Women's 50m Freestyle heat on Day 7 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on Aug. 12, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Adam Pretty/Getty Images)

Last month marked the 50th anniversary of Title IX, the 37-word statute declaring that no one could be discriminated against or denied participation on the basis of sex in any educational program receiving federal dollars. Practically speaking, it means that if a public school has a basketball or swimming program for boys, there has to be one for girls as well.

The year before Title IX passed, about 300,000 girls played high school sports. Today, there are 3.5 million. However, Title IX did not and was not meant to bring equity to Black girls. In fact, the word 'race' was never mentioned in the short statute.

Tina Sloan Green has dedicated her career to leveling the playing field for girls and women of color. She was the first Black woman to play on the U.S. national field hockey team, the first Black coach of a college lacrosse team, and eventually founded the Black Women in Sports Foundation. Sloan Green joins us.

This segment aired on July 5, 2022.

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