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'He Was A Man Capable Of Enormous Happiness': Remembering Holocaust Survivor And Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel04:52
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In a speech during a 1985 White House ceremony in which he was presented with the Congressional Gold Medal, Elie Wiesel pleaded with President Ronald Reagan to abandon a scheduled stop at a military cemetery during his coming visit to Germany. (AP)
In a speech during a 1985 White House ceremony in which he was presented with the Congressional Gold Medal, Elie Wiesel pleaded with President Ronald Reagan to abandon a scheduled stop at a military cemetery during his coming visit to Germany. (AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Upon receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986, writer, humanitarian and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel said, "I have tried to keep memory alive, that I have tried to fight those who would forget. Because if we forget, we are guilty, we are accomplices."

Wiesel — who spent nearly four decades as a professor at Boston University — died over the weekend at the age of 87.

Rabbi Joseph Polak was a close friend of Elie Wiesel. Polak is rabbi emeritus of the Hillel House at Boston University. When Polak was an infant, he and his family were taken by the Nazis to the concentration camp Westerbork in the Netherlands and then to Bergen-Belsen in Germany.

Rabbi Polak joined Morning Edition to remember the legacy and impact of Wiesel.

This segment aired on July 4, 2016.

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Deborah Becker Twitter Host/Reporter
Deborah Becker is a senior correspondent and host at WBUR. Her reporting focuses on mental health, criminal justice and education.

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