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Boston's Publishing Industry Mourns Borders' Death

This article is more than 8 years old.
All 14 Borders stores in Massachusetts, include this one in Boston's Back Bay, are set to close. (Mai.../Flickr)
All 14 Borders stores in Massachusetts, include this one in Boston's Back Bay, are set to close. (Mai.../Flickr)

Liquidation sales begin Friday at the 14 Borders bookstores in Massachusetts.

Among the many people worried about the company's demise, Boston's publishing industry isn't happy to see the national chain go.

With Borders out of the picture, Barnes & Noble remains the only national bookstore chain. That means fewer sales and marketing opportunities for Boston publishers and local authors.

Losing Borders makes it harder to put a new book under a reader's nose, according to Jill Kneerim, who runs the literary agency Kneerim & Williams.

"Because there are lots of people out there who actually would like to read that book," Kneerim said. "One of the great ways they used to encounter it was simply finding it in the bookstore."

Boston’s publishing industry has gotten smaller in recent years. Kneerim says the closing of Borders underlines the challenge of finding the best way to deliver books and keep paying authors well.

This program aired on July 22, 2011. The audio for this program is not available.

Curt Nickisch Twitter Business & Technology Reporter
Curt Nickisch was formerly WBUR's business and technology reporter.

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