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MBTA Rail Service Reopens, But It's Another Slow-Moving Commute

Commuters wait for the Red Line in Cambridge's busy Porter Square station Wednesday morning. MBTA rail service is up again, but it's running a limited schedule. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Commuters wait for the Red Line in Cambridge's busy Porter Square station Wednesday morning. MBTA rail service is up again, but it's running a limited schedule. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
This article is more than 5 years old.

After the latest winter storm smacked Massachusetts, the state stretched its legs Wednesday, as many schools, government offices and businesses reopened — and MBTA rail service got up and running again. But commuters, especially those heading into Boston, still encountered issues.

The MBTA resumed subway service after a suspension Tuesday, but was running on a limited schedule. The commuter rail planned on "making approximately 70% of the trips regularly scheduled." The T also warned of delays on bus routes due to snow-clogged streets.

There were widespread delays, long lines and crowded trains on subway and commuter rail lines early Wednesday, and many took to social media to express their frustration.


The beleaguered transit agency had buckled under the weight of three major snowstorms in two weeks, before deciding on the daylong rail service suspension Tuesday. An emotional Beverly Scott, the MBTA general manager, defended her organization on Tuesday.

Drivers also experienced delays Wednesday morning, as commuters returned in heavy volume to major arteries.

Eastbound traffic on the Mass Pike moves slowly toward the city Wednesday morning. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Eastbound traffic on the Mass Pike moves slowly toward the city Wednesday morning. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Smaller roads in area towns and cities were slushy, and many lanes were narrowed by the walls of snow that line them, contributing to the extensive traffic delays.

Most schools, including Boston's, reopened Wednesday after two days closed. However, a number of schools, especially on the South Shore, remained closed or delayed Wednesday.

In Somerville, officials decided to close schools for the rest of the week due to concerns about the possibility of roof collapses. After days off due to Monday's storm and with February vacation next week, the move means students there will go two full weeks without class.

All schools are now forced to decide how to make up for lost days, and in Boston, classes will be held on both Evacuation Day and Bunker Hill Day.

This article was originally published on February 11, 2015.

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