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Baker Remains Opposed To GOP Health Care Bill

"After our administration’s initial review, I remain concerned that the revised Better Care Reconciliation Act would still put a harmful strain on the state’s ability to continue providing health care coverage for the people of Massachusetts," Baker said on Friday. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
"After our administration’s initial review, I remain concerned that the revised Better Care Reconciliation Act would still put a harmful strain on the state’s ability to continue providing health care coverage for the people of Massachusetts," Baker said on Friday. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Republican Gov. Charlie Baker says a preliminary review by his administration of the latest version of the Senate GOP health care bill has not changed his opinion that it would be harmful to Massachusetts.

Baker listed a number of objections to the bill in a statement released on Friday:

"This proposal would leave more people uninsured, eliminate certain essential health benefits, further destabilize insurance markets, reduce federal funding and negatively impact important family planning services," Baker said. "Our administration will keep working with other governors, the Congressional delegation and federal officials to advocate for bipartisan solutions that work for Massachusetts and preserve state control, including protecting our waiver to support behavioral health, fighting the opioid epidemic and funding for Planned Parenthood."

Last month, the governor said his administration's analysis of the first GOP bill, later withdrawn by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, would result in 264,000 Massachusetts residents losing coverage and cost the state $8.2 billion in federal funds.

Baker is calling for a bipartisan approach to health care reform in Washington.

With reporting from The Associated Press.

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