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It Wasn't Just In Your Head — This Was The Hottest June On Record In Boston

Children play in the Rings Fountain at the Rose Kennedy Greenway during a hot afternoon. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
Children play in the Rings Fountain at the Rose Kennedy Greenway during a hot afternoon. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

The data is in, and June 2021 was hot!

In fact, last month was the warmest June on record in Boston’s history.

With two heat waves in the span of a few weeks, you might not be surprised to hear this. But you may be surprised by some of these other numbers and facts from the National Weather Service — we certainly were.

1. The average temperature in Boston during June is 68 degrees Fahrenheit. This year, it was 74.4 degrees.

The previous record was 73.4 degrees in 1976.

2. Boston experienced 9 days in June where the mercury hit 90 degrees or higher.

(Courtesy Climate Central)
(Courtesy Climate Central)

3. On June 30, the temperature in Boston hit 100 degrees. The last time recorded temperatures were this high during the month of June was in 1952.

The last time it hit 100 degrees in Boston at any point during the summer was July 2011.

4. Boston also saw below average rainfall during June 2021.

Typically, the city gets 3.89 inches of rain; this year, it only got 2.57 inches.

What was almost a double rainbow was seen over East Somerville on Wednesday evening, after afternoon storms. More rain is expected Thursday and into the holiday weekend. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
What was almost a double rainbow was seen over East Somerville on Wednesday evening, after afternoon storms. More rain is expected Thursday and into the holiday weekend. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

5. It was really hot in other parts of the state, too.

Worcester experienced its second hottest June on record this year. The average temperature in June is 65.2 degrees, and this year it was 70 degrees. (The record is 70.4 degrees.)

6. Between 1895 and 2011, average temperatures in the Northeast increased by about 2 degrees Fahrenheit.

That makes it one of the fastest warming regions in the country. And scientists are clear about what’s driving this: human-induced climate change.

Modeled air temperature in Boston, Cambridge and Brookline. (Maps created by researchers at the Museum of Science, Boston and the Helmuth Lab at Northeastern University)
Modeled air temperature in Boston, Cambridge and Brookline. (Maps created by researchers at the Museum of Science, Boston and the Helmuth Lab at Northeastern University)


7. In May, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) published it’s so-called “New Climate Normals.”

In both Boston and Worcester, the new normal summer temperature is half a degree hotter than it was in the previous 30-year period.

In 2021, NOAA updated its New Climate Normals. (Courtesy NOAA)
In 2021, NOAA updated its New Climate Normals. (Courtesy NOAA)

Related:

Miriam Wasser Twitter Reporter, EarthWhile
Miriam Wasser is a reporter for WBUR's environmental vertical.

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