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3 Stories: Brock Turner's Sentencing, Braves' Stadium Saga, Fitbit Fraud07:39
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Fitbits have become the latest tool for cheating in corporate america... although maybe not of the kind you'd expect. (Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
Fitbits have become the latest tool for cheating in corporate america... although maybe not of the kind you'd expect. (Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Last week, convicted rapist Brock Turner was sentenced to only six months in prison. Did Turner's status as a former college swimmer factor into his light sentence? And what can be done to best fight campus sexual assault? That's up first on this week's edition of “3 Stories You Should Know.”

Rachel Bachman of the Wall Street Journal and Patrick Hruby of Vice Sports joined Bill Littlefield.
1. Brock Turner's Sentencing
Former Stanford swimmer Brock Turner, who was convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman in 2015, received only a six-month sentence. Bill Littlefield scrutinizes the undue influence of Turner's athlete status.


Based on the reactions to the sentencing, which have been all over the Internet, I know I’m not the only person who thinks considering a man’s athletic prowess when deciding how long he should be incarcerated for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman is insane.

2. Cobb County And The Braves
The Atlanta Braves are leaving Turner Field, which has only been their home in downtown Atlanta for 20 years. And the move has not come without controversy. Patrick Hruby breaks down this story's many levels of shadiness.


Residents of [Cobb] County voted for $40 million of new parks. You know, not ballparks to enrich billionaire owners and millionaire players — just public parks to enrich the rest of us. But it turns out the money for that is now being siphoned off to help pay for this new baseball stadium.

3. Fitbit Fraud
Employees taking part in workplace wellness initiatives have been caught cheating. How were they cheating? With puppies, hamster wheels and power drills. Rachel Bachman wonders whether these contests are worth it.


These contests get people to see how many steps they can take in a few weeks or months. There's just one problem with them: they can be cheated. In fact in some cases people are cheating with no money on the line. They are literally cheating for nothing.

More Stories You Should Know:

This segment aired on June 11, 2016.

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