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The Amelia Earhart Story24:19
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Amelia Earhart, seen in an undated photo. (AP)
Amelia Earhart, seen in an undated photo. (AP)

Amelia Earhart is about to take the country by storm, yet again.

In 1928, in the trail of Charles Lindbergh, the fresh-faced Kansas girl was the first woman in history to fly across the Atlantic.

The country went nuts for Amelia. The flying cap, the goggles, the scarf, the smile — the irresistible glamour of a fearless feminist flier.

In 1937 she went down over shark-infested waters in the Pacific. Vanished. Now, Hilary Swank and Richard Gere bring the story back to the big screen.

We’ve got the biographer who told the filmmakers' story. This hour, On Point: The real Amelia Earhart.

You can join the conversation. Tell us what you think — here on this page, on Twitter, and on Facebook.Guests:

Joining us from New York is Susan Butler, author of "East to the Dawn: The Life of Amelia Earhart," a biography on which the new film "Amelia" is based. She's also a consultant to the film.

From Berkeley, Calif., we're joined by Maggie Gee. Inspired by Amelia Earhart to become a pilot, she flew with the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) in World War II and was recently awarded a Congressional Gold Medal for her services.  She's the subject of the new children's book "Sky High: The True Story of Maggie Gee," by Marissa Moss.

And from Wilmington, Del., we're joined by Ric Gillespie, director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR). He's led eight archaeological expeditions to Nikumaruro, formerly Gardner Island, where he believes Amelia Earhart was marooned in 1937.  He's author of "Finding Amelia: The True Story of the Earhart Disappearance."

More:

Read The New Yorker's take on Amelia Earhart's life and legacy.

Watch the official trailer for "Amelia," out in theaters this Friday:

Watch Maggie Gee talk about her experience as a female pilot during WWII:

This program aired on October 21, 2009.

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