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The Economics Of Election 2016: GOP Debate47:39
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The economy, center stage at the GOP debate. We’ll look at the latest from Carson, Trump, Bush, Rubio and more.

Marco Rubio, right, and Jeb Bush, argue a point during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP)
Marco Rubio, right, and Jeb Bush, argue a point during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP)

The economy was the advertised issue of the night. The contenders fought for time and appeal. The moderators took some heavy grief. Debate number three for the Republicans last night saw a good night for Marco Rubio, a tough night for Jeb Bush. Trump and Carson hanging in. Ted Cruz lashing out. Ohio governor John Kasich railing against “fantasy” from his competition on the debate stage. The big GOP message remained “cut government.” How, and where, and what to do on taxes and how to share the pie – all on the table. This hour On Point, the Republicans, back in debate.
-- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Rachel Smolkin, executive editor of CNN Politics. (@RachelSmolkin)

Rana Foroohar, assistant managing editor for economics and business at TIME Magazine. (@RanaForoohar)

Megan McArdle, economics, business and public policy columnist at Bloomberg View. Author of "The Up Side Of Down." (@asymmetricinfo)

From Tom’s Reading List

POLITICO: Bush walks into Rubio's trap — "Jeb Bush needed a big debate performance more than anyone on the stage. Instead, he faded away, and his campaign isn’t even bothering to argue otherwise. Banging on the CNBC production team’s door halfway through the debate, campaign manager Danny Diaz reamed the debate host over how little time Bush was getting. In the end, the one-time front-runner scored less than seven minutes, worse than almost every other candidate."

Bloomberg View: What Campaign Donations Can't Buy — "One by one, we’ve stripped away the means that parties used to control their membership: replaced party bosses with primary elections, limited the ability of big donors to directly fund and influence campaigns, cracked down on earmarks and other pork-barrel policies, torn down the congressional institutional structures that used to let a few powerful politicians essentially control what bills made it to a vote."

TIME: How Clintonomics Created Carly Fiorina — "By now, GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina’s business record has been well parsed: As CEO of Hewlett-Packard in the late 1990s and early 2000s, she orchestrated the blockbuster merger with computer maker Compaq. She boosted short-term growth by cutting research and development, a hallmark of HP since its founding in 1939, and favoring areas like marketing instead. When things went south–some 30,000 employees lost their jobs as the company’s stock-market value was cut in half–Fiorina flew away in a golden parachute worth $21 million."

This program aired on October 29, 2015.

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