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What The Trump Election Means For Washington47:44
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Washington, power and policy after the Trump election.

President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with Vice President-elect Mike Pence as he gives his acceptance speech during his election night rally,. (John Locher/AP)
President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with Vice President-elect Mike Pence as he gives his acceptance speech during his election night rally,. (John Locher/AP)

Donald Trump ran for president on his gut, and a lot of Americans responded. When he spoke of policy – what he would actually do – it was big and broad. Build a wall, drain the swamp, tear up the deal, lock her up. Now he’s president-elect. Republicans will run Washington, but Republican leadership and Donald Trump have not always been anywhere near the same page. So, what happens? This hour On Point, Washington, power and policy after the Trump election. — Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Yamiche Alcindor, reporter and videographer covering national politics for the New York Times. (@Yamiche)

Eliana Johnson, Washington editor for the National Review. (@elianayjohnson)

Ellen Goodman, writer, journalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist. Author of "Paper Trail," among others. (@ellengoodman)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst. (@JackBeattyNPR)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Donald Trump’s Victory Promises to Upend the International Order — "For the first time since before World War II, Americans chose a president who promised to reverse the internationalism practiced by predecessors of both parties and to build walls both physical and metaphorical. Mr. Trump’s win foreshadowed an America more focused on its own affairs while leaving the world to take care of itself."

National Review: Republicans Hold the Senate on a Night that Defied the Odds — "In the end, while Republican Senate candidates had feared Trump would act as a weight on their electoral fortunes, their concerns were overwrought. The rural, working-class voters who turned out to support him helped boost them to victory in areas Republicans have struggled. But GOP Senate candidates ran ahead of Trump in urban areas from the St. Louis suburbs to Miami, Philadelphia, and Milwaukee, allowing them to run ahead of him in all but the most conservative states."

POLITICO: Can Trump actually govern? — "It didn't matter to Donald Trump's supporters that he offered voters few specifics on policy. It didn't matter to them that, in building out his campaign, he seemed to value flattery and loyalty over experience. It didn't matter, to many at least, that he insulted his rivals, objectified women, mocked the disabled and encouraged violence at his rallies. Now it matters to the United States and the world."

This program aired on November 9, 2016.

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