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The U.S. And Mexico In A Trump Administration46:59
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The US and Mexico after Donald Trump’s election. From the wall to NAFTA to big deportation threats, we’ll drill down into what’s next in a US-Mexico face-off.

In this file photo, President-Elect Donald Trump, right, speaks during a joint statement with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto, left, at Los Pinos, the official presidential residence, in Mexico City. (Dario Lopez-Mills/AP)
In this file photo, President-Elect Donald Trump, right, speaks during a joint statement with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto, left, at Los Pinos, the official presidential residence, in Mexico City. (Dario Lopez-Mills/AP)

The NFL’s Houston and Oakland teams play the league’s Monday Night Football game tonight in Mexico City. Azteca Stadium. First time ever a regular season Monday night game kicks off outside the United States. After that, we’re not so sure about US-Mexico relations. President-elect Donald Trump has promised to build a wall, deport millions, and maybe tear up NAFTA. What would that mean for Mexicans, Americans, these neighbors?  This hour On Point, the US and Mexico in the age of Trump. -- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Ana Maria Salazar, Mexican-American political analyst. TV and radio anchor in Mexico, where she currently hosts Imagen News and Living in Mexico. Weekly columnist at El Financiero. Former Deputy Assistant U.S. Secretary of Defense for Drug Enforcement. (@Amsalazar)

Azam Ahmed, New York Times bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. (@azamsahmed)

Jorge Castaneda, Mexican politician and academic. Former Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Professor of politics and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at New York University. (@jorgegcastaneda)

Kay Bailey Hutchinson, former U.S. Senator (R-TX). Senior counsel at Bracewell LLP. (@kaybaileyhutch)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: After Trump’s Win, an Anxious Mexico Asks: What’s Next? -- "Ever since the election of Donald J. Trump to the American presidency, Juan Pardinas, a Mexican academic, has been thinking back to his childhood. Specifically, the Cold War era, when his days as a young boy were filled with a medium-grade anxiety that the Russians might incite a nuclear war that could devastate North America."

PRI: Trump's plan to fund his wall could actually make more Mexicans migrate north -- "President-elect Donald Trump has made many promises — and a few threats. Often, the latter are directed at Mexico. For example, he's promised that Mexico will pay for the border wall he says must be built. His idea to do that is to stop people in the US from sending money back to their families in Mexico. The wire transfers known as 'remittances.' They are a big deal for the Mexican economy. Some $24 billion flow into the country through remittances. Like many of Trump's plans, though, he's not provided a lot of public details."

The Wall Street Journal: Mexico Lifts Rates Amid Peso’s Fall, Trump’s Rise — "For many in Mexico, the idea that free trade with the U.S. might be at risk has come as a shock. Mexico has placed its bets on free trade as the path to development, with 44 such deals, the most of any nation. 'Mexico has no Plan B for the potential shock from a U.S. withdrawal from Nafta,' Luis Arcentales, chief economist for Latin America from Morgan Stanley, wrote in a note to clients on Wednesday."

This program aired on November 21, 2016.

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