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The Sinkhole Surge In Florida09:16
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Water continues to flow into a large sinkhole on the Mosaic Co. property shown in this aerial photo Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, in Mulberry, Fla. Neighbors of the huge sinkhole sending cascades of contaminated water and fertilizer plant waste into Florida's main drinking-water aquifer are fearful and fuming that it took weeks for them to be notified about the disaster. Many are still waiting anxiously for results from tests for radiation and toxic chemicals in their well water. (Chris O'Meara/AP)
Water continues to flow into a large sinkhole on the Mosaic Co. property shown in this aerial photo Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, in Mulberry, Fla. Neighbors of the huge sinkhole sending cascades of contaminated water and fertilizer plant waste into Florida's main drinking-water aquifer are fearful and fuming that it took weeks for them to be notified about the disaster. Many are still waiting anxiously for results from tests for radiation and toxic chemicals in their well water. (Chris O'Meara/AP)
This article is more than 1 year old.

With Jane Clayson

After last fall's Hurricane Irma, the number of sinkholes in Florida is on the rise.

Guests:

Erik Sandoval, reporter for WKMG-TV NEWS 6, the CBS affiliate in Orlando. He's been reporting on the sinkholes in Ocala, Florida. (@ErikSandoval)

Anthony Randazzo, president of Geohazards Inc., a geotechnical consulting firm that deals with geological hazards, of which sinkholes are the most prominent. Professor Emeritus at the University of Florida.

This segment aired on May 8, 2018.

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