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What's On The Menu For Thanksgiving Dinner? Getting Ready For Your Feast46:09
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This Oct. 17, 2011 photo shows a sweet and spicy turkey surrounded by, clockwise from top, smashed harvest vegetables, oven-candied green beans amandine, gravy, brown sugar and oatmeal rolls and candied bacon stuffing in Concord, N.H.  (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)MoreCloseclosemore
This Oct. 17, 2011 photo shows a sweet and spicy turkey surrounded by, clockwise from top, smashed harvest vegetables, oven-candied green beans amandine, gravy, brown sugar and oatmeal rolls and candied bacon stuffing in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

With Jane Clayson

Tips for a successful Thanksgiving feast. We’ll talk turkey and all the trimmings with New York Times food editor Sam Sifton.

Guest

Sam Sifton, food editor of The New York Times. Author of "Thanksgiving: How to Cook It Well." (@samsifton)

From The On Point Kitchen

The On Point team enjoys some cranberry-pomegranate relish made by producer Stef Kotsonis (second from left). (Alex Schroeder/On Point)
The On Point team enjoys some cranberry-pomegranate relish made by producer Stef Kotsonis (second from left). (Alex Schroeder/On Point)

From The Reading List

New York Times: "Sam Sifton’s 20 Favorite Thanksgiving Recipes"

Boston Globe: "Holiday hacks: Top chefs’ tips for a successful Thanksgiving spread" — "Overdone meat. Mashed potatoes that taste like wallpaper paste. Hungry guests, harried hosts — despite the Instagram-gauzy anticipation, Thanksgiving sometimes ends with the host in the garage, slugging a jug of lukewarm chardonnay. And it’s not just because of political chatter or awkward inquiries from meddling aunties.

"There’s a reason the American Psychological Association maintains a separate section on its website about managing holiday expectations. This is especially applicable for the chef: You want to put your best foot forward and delight your guests. Partially it’s virtuous, and partially it’s about ego.

"But what if you have absolutely no idea what you’re doing? If you have been called upon to host — or even if you’ve volunteered, for some reason — don’t overdo it. Breathe deeply and read on. Here are realistic tips for civilians, from the experts."

New York Times: "The Rise and Fall of Turkey Brining" — "Dear Thanksgiving cooks of America: On behalf of food writers everywhere, I apologize.

"For nearly two decades now, many of us have suggested that you plunge your turkey into a bucket of flavored salt water for a day or two. The promise was an end to dryness and a bulletproof solution to the conundrum of cooking a bird with both light and dark meat.

"But like the length of a trouser leg, turkey fashion shifts. Interviews with the big players in food media over the past few weeks suggest that the wet, salty turkey has lost its appeal among many of the people who once did the most to promote it."

Forbes: "Thanksgiving Tips From Michelin Star Chefs" — "Shopping, chopping, cooking—how do the pros get it done? 'Over-planning is key,' according to Patti Jackson of Delaware & Hudson. 'I make a big list, breaking down each dish into components for both shopping and prep. Days before the big event, I dice several quarts of onions and celery, peel potatoes and other vegetables and process them to the point of cooking, cube bread for stuffing, and make pie shells and fillings in advance. I shred cheese and mix dips and I label everything. We even fill the fancy salt and pepper shakers and set the table the weekend beforehand.'

"Del Posto’s Melissa Rodriguez agrees that 'any big holiday dinner should involve a little bit of planning and organization.' To relieve some of the pressure she says you should accept help from absolutely anyone who offers. Elise Kornack, formerly of Take Root, says you should 'make whatever you can days ahead. Things like gravy, cranberry sauce, pies and mashed potatoes can be made two days in advance. And feel free to delegate other items—even the turkey—to friends and family.' "

This program aired on November 14, 2018.

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