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Researcher Thinks Amelia Earhart's Remains Were Found Years Ago03:54
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In this image Amelia Earhart at the controls of her plane nicknamed the “Flying Laboratory” on July 3, 1931. (AP Photo)
In this image Amelia Earhart at the controls of her plane nicknamed the “Flying Laboratory” on July 3, 1931. (AP Photo)
This article is more than 1 year old.

The mystery of the disappearance of the first woman to fly alone across the Atlantic Ocean may be solved.

A new study by the University of Tennessee's Richard Jantz says bones that were found on a Pacific Island in 1940 may have been misidentified and could actually have been the bones of Amelia Earhart.

This follows another theory that Earhart survived a crash landing and was taken prisoner by Japanese forces in the lead up to World War II.

Guest

Debra Michals, is a women's historian, assistant professor and Director of Women's and Gender Studies at Merrimack College.

This segment aired on March 9, 2018.

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