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Boston Feels The Impact Of Longest Shutdown In U.S. History22:00
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Government workers and their supporters hold signs during a protest in Boston Friday. The workers rallied with Democratic U.S. Sen. Ed Markey and other supporters to urge that the Republican president put an end to the shutdown so they can get back to work. (Michael Dwyer/AP)
Government workers and their supporters hold signs during a protest in Boston Friday. The workers rallied with Democratic U.S. Sen. Ed Markey and other supporters to urge that the Republican president put an end to the shutdown so they can get back to work. (Michael Dwyer/AP)
This article is more than 2 years old.

Monday marked day 24 of the longest government shutdown in U.S. history.

Some airports have closed security checkpoints because TSA officers aren't coming to work. Produce is going unchecked because FDA inspectors have been furloughed. And millions of Americans who depend on federally subsidized housing run the risk of eviction.

But in Washington, there are no signs of a compromise to reopen the government.

We spoke to two federal employees, and a former federal judge, to assess the impact of the shutdown here in Boston.

Guests

Hugh Martinez, senior enforcement counsel for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Tulia VanDunk, attorney-adviser at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Nancy Gertner, former Massachusetts federal judge, senior lecturer at Harvard Law School and WBUR legal analyst. She tweets @ngertner.

This segment aired on January 14, 2019.

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