Advertisement

100 Years Later: Lessons From Boston's Molasses Flood Of 191913:31
Download

Play
The ruins of a tank containing 2 1/2 million gallons of molasses lie in a heap after an eruption that hurled trucks against buildings and crumpled houses in the North End of Boston, on Jan. 15, 1919. The disaster took 21 lives and injured 40. (AP)
The ruins of a tank containing 2 1/2 million gallons of molasses lie in a heap after an eruption that hurled trucks against buildings and crumpled houses in the North End of Boston, on Jan. 15, 1919. The disaster took 21 lives and injured 40. (AP)
This article is more than 2 years old.

On a cold January day 100 years ago, a massive tank of molasses exploded in Boston's North End, unleashing a tsunami of molasses onto the streets. The wave  killed 21 people and injured hundreds more. And the aftermath of the disaster eventually led to important changes to how we construct and inspect buildings in America.

Guest

Robert Allison, professor of history at Suffolk University. He tweets @historyofboston.

This segment aired on January 15, 2019.

Jamie Bologna Twitter Producer/Director, Radio Boston
Jamie Bologna is producer and director of Radio Boston.

More…

Maria Garcia Twitter Managing Editor
Maria Garcia is WBUR's Managing Editor and the creator of "Anything for Selena."

More…

Advertisement

Advertisement