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Syrian Teen Seeking Medical Treatment For Severe Burns Fights Visa Denial08:30
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In this April 25, 2018 file photo, a person holds up a sign that reads "No Muslim Ban" during an anti-Muslim ban rally as the Supreme Court hears arguments about wether President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from several mostly Muslim countries violates immigration law or the Constitution in Washington. (Andrew Harnik/AP)
In this April 25, 2018 file photo, a person holds up a sign that reads "No Muslim Ban" during an anti-Muslim ban rally as the Supreme Court hears arguments about wether President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from several mostly Muslim countries violates immigration law or the Constitution in Washington. (Andrew Harnik/AP)
This article is more than 2 years old.

The House of Peace, a nonprofit in Ipswich, Mass., is among those working on behalf of a 16-year-old Syrian girl who is seeking medical treatment in the U.S. after she was disfigured in a bomb attack.

After the attack, the young girl whom we're referring to only by her first name, Marwa, fled to Turkey and then Germany where she and her family now live.

The doctors there are recommending more specialty treatment at Shriners Hospital for Children in Boston, but Marwa's visa request was denied because she could not prove that she plans to stay in Germany.

Guests

Carrie Schuchardt, president of the House of Peace, which provides temporary housing for refugees and others.

Liz Nicholson, volunteer advocate for refugees and English lecturer at the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen–Nürnberg.

This segment aired on January 29, 2019.

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