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Extremism and accountability: How the aftermath of Jan. 6 impacts future plots

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A demonstrator supporting former President Trump holds a sign that says, "Stop the steal" outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center where votes are being counted on Nov. 6, 2020, in Philadelphia. (Rebecca Blackwell/AP)
A demonstrator supporting former President Trump holds a sign that says, "Stop the steal" outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center where votes are being counted on Nov. 6, 2020, in Philadelphia. (Rebecca Blackwell/AP)

It started with 'The Big Lie." Many argue that led directly to the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 last year.

Over the last 12 months, hundreds have been arrested and charged in connection with the insurrection, including nearly a dozen from New England and six from Massachusetts.

But that's just a fraction of those who breached the Capitol that day. And as investigations — both by law enforcement and Congress continue - it has become clear that there was coordination, planning, at least by and for some of the participants, behind that breach.

We talk more about accountability, and what the future may hold for extremism locally and nationally with Joan Donovan, Research Director at Harvard's Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics, and Public Policy and Andrew Lelling, former US Attorney for Massachusetts under the Trump Administration. Lelling coordinated with the U.S. Attorney's office in the District of Columbia on prosecutions.

This segment aired on January 6, 2022.

Amanda Beland Twitter Producer/Director
Amanda Beland is a producer and director for Radio Boston. She also reports for the WBUR newsroom.

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Tiziana Dearing Twitter Host, Radio Boston
Tiziana Dearing is the host of Radio Boston.

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