Rundown 8/14

This article is more than 10 years old.

Fact v. Fiction in Healthcare, Part 2

Healthcare reform has made a lot of people nervous. Earlier this week we spoke with Noam Levey of the Los Angeles Times about some of the more controversial parts of it — would abortions be covered? How would end-of-life care be addressed? We've invited him back to get into more of the nitty gritty — about pre-exisiting conditions, portability, single payers options, and others issues.

Tomato Blight

(Flickr/ellievahoutte)
(Flickr/ellievahoutte)

Late blight has struck many tomato growers this summer. The fungal disease usually hits late in the growing season, but this year's unusually cool and wet spring and summer has it sweeping through gardens and farmlands through the Northeast and decimating crops.

We talk with Amy Hepworth who runs Hepworth Farms in Milton, New York. Tomatoes are her speciality and she's been spending a good deal of time and money fighting off the disease.

Letters

We hear from listeners.

The Basij Militia in Iran

One of the groups that is helping President Ahmadinejad hold onto power in Iran is the Basij militia. They are ordinary Iranians who can appear out of nowhere in the middle of a protest; they can be wearing a uniform or regular street clothing. And they can arrest people. But will they stay behind Ahmadinejad? John Leyne of the BBC reports on this voluntary militia.

And Now This Commercial Interruption

Parents looking for the best new stroller or BPA-safe bottle often turn to "mommy bloggers" for advice. But it turns out many of those bloggers are actually getting paid to review products by the companies that make them. Now the FTC is considering new rules that would force bloggers and traditional media to disclose what's a paid ad and what's not. Here & Now media analyst and Boston University communication professor, John Carroll, tells us what the government is doing to promote truth in advertising.

CORRECTION: We incorrectly identified Heather Armstrong's blog, it is dooce.com.

Remembering A Rock Radio Legend

After a 40- year run, Boston's iconic rock station, WBCN signed off the air for the last time this week, after CBS radio decided to replace it with an all sports station. We speak with Charles Laquidara, who hosted "The Big Mattress" on WBCN from 1969-1996, we also hear from Danny Schechter, who was known as "the news dissector" on WBCN.

This program aired on August 14, 2009. The audio for this program is not available.

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