Drought-Stricken Texas Town Forced To Truck In Water04:37
Download

Play
This article is more than 7 years old.
A contractor trucks in water to a storage tank in Spicewood Beach, Texas Monday, January 30. (Photo courtesy of StateImpact Texas)
A contractor trucks in water to a storage tank in Spicewood Beach, Texas Monday, January 30. (Photo courtesy of StateImpact Texas)

Spicewood Beach, Texas, population 1,100, made news last week when it became the first place in the drought-stricken state to truck water into town because its well was running dry.

Now, Spicewood Beach is in the news again because it turns out the agency that controls the town's water was selling it and shipping it out of town just weeks before the crisis.

The Lower Colorado River Authority, the public agency that manages the water, sold the water while the town's well was running dry. The agency said it did nothing wrong, because it was selling the water to private haulers who in turn, sold it to homeowners, industries and construction projects.

The agency also said that once the well water fell beneath a certain level, the agency stopped selling water.

Texas officials say Spicewood Beach is one of 13 towns that will likely run out of water in the coming months.

Guest:

  • Mose Buchele, reporter for StateImpact Texas, a reporting collaboration between KUT-Austin and NPR that focuses on energy and environmental issues.

This segment aired on February 7, 2012.

Support the news

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news