Why Some College Sports Programs Are Running In The Red08:07
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Florida's linebacker Michael Taylor (15) gets a hand full of jersey as he tries to bring down Quinton Dunbar (1) during the first half of the Orange & Blue football game in Gainesville, Fla. (AP)
Florida's linebacker Michael Taylor (15) gets a hand full of jersey as he tries to bring down Quinton Dunbar (1) during the first half of the Orange & Blue football game in Gainesville, Fla. (AP)

Division one universities spend a lot on their sports programs, but only a handful make enough money from sports to stay in the black.

According to a report in USA Today, 10 schools where football is the big sport, made or spent at least $100 million on athletics last year.

The University of Texas tops the list when it comes to profits, earning about $17-million.

But other schools are struggling to compete, both on the field and the balance sheet.

Included in that group is Florida State, a former football power that has fallen on hard times, losing games and fan support.

The school's athletic department is facing a $2.4 million budget deficit and may have to cut the football team's recruiting and travel budget to fill the gap.

A nearly $5 million deficit has already forced the University of Maryland to eliminate eight sports.

High Spending, Poor Results

Brad Wolverton, reporter for the Chronicle of Higher Education, told Here and Now's Sacha Pfeiffer that part of the problem is that schools are spending more on sports, and in particular, coach's salaries.

"It's a really unusual time in college sports where you're seeing continued spending but you're not seeing in some cases as much money coming in," he said.

In many cases, despite increased spending, the team's performance isn't high, and fan enthusiasm, along with alumni and booster donations, is falling.

Guest:

  • Brad Wolverton, reporter for the Chronicle of Higher Education

This segment aired on May 17, 2012.

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