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Will The Iran Nuclear Deal Help Shape Obama's Legacy?04:01
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President Barack Obama speaks about the negotiations to curb Iran's nuclear technologies during a statement in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, Thursday, April 2. Iran and and six world powers have agreed on the outlines of an understanding that would open the path to a final phase of nuclear negotiations. (J. David Ake/AP)
President Barack Obama speaks about the negotiations to curb Iran's nuclear technologies during a statement in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, Thursday, April 2. Iran and and six world powers have agreed on the outlines of an understanding that would open the path to a final phase of nuclear negotiations. (J. David Ake/AP)
This article is more than 6 years old.

Negotiators were able to reach a framework agreement last week on a nuclear deal with Iran, but some members of Congress back home have expressed concern about the deal.

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham called President Obama a "flawed negotiator," and said Congress needs to vote on any agreement before it’s set in stone. Obama is pushing back, saying this is the best deal the U.S. can get.

NPR Politics Editor Domenico Montanaro talks with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson about how the deal might shape Obama’s legacy, despite continuing criticism from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and turmoil abroad in the Middle East and between Ukraine and Russia. Also, Montanaro discusses the announcement expected tomorrow from Sen. Rand Paul that he is running for president.

Guest

  • Domenico Montanaro, politics editor at NPR. He tweets @domenicoNPR.

This segment aired on April 6, 2015.

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