Support the news

Deal To Limit Iran's Nuclear Program Finally Reached04:47
Download

Play
President Barack Obama, standing with Vice President Joe Biden, conducts a press conference in the East Room of the White House in response to the Iran Nuclear Deal, on July 14, 2015 in Washington, DC. The landmark deal will limit Iran's nuclear program in exchange for relief from international sanctions. The agreement, which comes after almost two years of diplomacy, has also been praised by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. (Andrew Harnik/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama, standing with Vice President Joe Biden, conducts a press conference in the East Room of the White House in response to the Iran Nuclear Deal, on July 14, 2015 in Washington, DC. The landmark deal will limit Iran's nuclear program in exchange for relief from international sanctions. The agreement, which comes after almost two years of diplomacy, has also been praised by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. (Andrew Harnik/Getty Images)
This article is more than 5 years old.

President Obama is praising the deal announced today in Vienna as one not based on trust, but based on verification. He said it removes every pathway to Iran producing a nuclear weapon.

But critics, such as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, say the deal does the opposite, that it clears the path for Iran to produced a nuclear weapon.

NPR's Michele Kelemen joins Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti with analysis.

Guest

This segment aired on July 14, 2015.

Support the news

Support the news