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Japan Moves To Expand Its Military Reach06:00
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People hold signs during a protest outside the National Diet on July 16, 2015 in Tokyo, Japan. The protest is against the security bill approved by the Lower House on July 16, 2015, that would allow Japan's Self Defense Forces to also defend aggression against its allies - a concept called collective self-defense, pushed by leading Liberal Democratic Party despite the surging opposition by lawmakers and ordinary voters. (Takashi Aoyama/Getty Images)
People hold signs during a protest outside the National Diet on July 16, 2015 in Tokyo, Japan. The protest is against the security bill approved by the Lower House on July 16, 2015, that would allow Japan's Self Defense Forces to also defend aggression against its allies - a concept called collective self-defense, pushed by leading Liberal Democratic Party despite the surging opposition by lawmakers and ordinary voters. (Takashi Aoyama/Getty Images)
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Under a bill approved by Japan's lower house of parliament today, the country's soldiers would be able to serve overseas for the first time since World War II. There were huge protests in the streets of Tokyo during the vote and opposition lawmakers walked out.

Shihoko Goto, senior associate for Northeast Asia at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, discusses the measure and its significance with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson.

Guest

  • Shihoko Goto, senior associate for Northeast Asia at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. She tweets @GotoEastAsia.

This segment aired on July 16, 2015.

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