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When Should Nations Apologize?05:57
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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe made an anniversary statement in recognition of the 70th anniversary of Japan's surrender from World War II, saying that neighboring nations will scrutinize for signs of sufficient remorse over Tokyo's past militarism. Abe expressed deep remorse over World War II and said previous national apologies were unshakable, but emphasized future generations should not have to keep saying sorry. (Toru Yamanaka/Getty Images)
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe made an anniversary statement in recognition of the 70th anniversary of Japan's surrender from World War II, saying that neighboring nations will scrutinize for signs of sufficient remorse over Tokyo's past militarism. Abe expressed deep remorse over World War II and said previous national apologies were unshakable, but emphasized future generations should not have to keep saying sorry. (Toru Yamanaka/Getty Images)
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Today, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe marked the 70th anniversary of Japan's surrender ending World War II. He upheld past apologies made by the country's government but he did not issue a new one.

China and South Korea, which suffered under Japanese occupation during the war, say that country has never fully atoned for its conduct during the war. How does a country do that, and should it?

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with international relations professor Thomas Berger about when and why a country should apologize for its actions.

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This segment aired on August 14, 2015.

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