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Ruling In Mexico Could Open The Door To Legalizing Marijuana05:41
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Activists participate in a rally in front of Supreme Court of Justice in Mexico City on October 28, 2015. Mexico's Supreme Court on Wednesday began discussing the possibility of decriminalizing marijuana for recreational use. A group of citizens who created the Sociedad Mexicana de Autoconsumo Responsable y Tolerante (SMART) organization lodged an appeal before the Supreme Court for the decriminalization of marijuana for no-profit uses. (Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images)
Activists participate in a rally in front of Supreme Court of Justice in Mexico City on October 28, 2015. Mexico's Supreme Court on Wednesday began discussing the possibility of decriminalizing marijuana for recreational use. A group of citizens who created the Sociedad Mexicana de Autoconsumo Responsable y Tolerante (SMART) organization lodged an appeal before the Supreme Court for the decriminalization of marijuana for no-profit uses. (Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images)
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Mexico's Supreme Court took a step toward legalizing pot yesterday when it ruled that growing, possessing and smoking marijuana recreationally is legal under the right to freedom. The ruling only applies to the plaintiffs in that case, a group of four people wanting to form a pot club.

Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with Juan Carlos Perez of BBC Mundo, the BBC's Spanish-language Latin American service, about what this ruling means for Mexico's drug laws and Latin America's war on drugs.

Note: This BBC interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

Guest

  • Juan Carlos Perez, Colombian journalist and multimedia editor for BBC Mundo. He tweets @JCPerezSalazar.

This segment aired on November 5, 2015.

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