Homelessness Among Veterans Declines, But Thousands Still In Streets06:35
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Disabled veteran Gloria Montes pets her dog Cache in her Bronx apartment November 9, 2015 in New York. Montes, who was forced to sleep in a car or on friends' floors until she found a place at a housing unit in the Bronx in September 2014, says she wants the military to do more to help veterans adjust to civilian life, and navigate the benefits that are open to them. (Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)
Disabled veteran Gloria Montes pets her dog Cache in her Bronx apartment November 9, 2015 in New York. Montes, who was forced to sleep in a car or on friends' floors until she found a place at a housing unit in the Bronx in September 2014, says she wants the military to do more to help veterans adjust to civilian life, and navigate the benefits that are open to them. (Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 3 years old.

In 2009, President Obama and then-Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki announced a lofty goal of zero percent homelessness among veterans by 2015. They haven't reached that goal, but they have made notable gains, decreasing homelessness by more than 30 percent in the past five years.

NPR veterans correspondent Quil Lawrence speaks with Here & Now's Eric Westervelt about how the government has been able to curb homelessness among veterans, but also where there is still work left to be done.

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This segment aired on December 16, 2015.

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