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Tracking Mercury's Transit Across The Sun03:37
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An Indian instructor helps an enthusiast to watch images of Mercury's transit through a reflection from a telescope at The Birla Planetarium in Chennai on May 9, 2016
Astronomers are preparing for one of the highlights of the skywatchers' year, when the Sun, Mercury and Earth all line up -- a phenomenon that happens just a dozen or so times per century.  (ARUN SANKAR/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indian instructor helps an enthusiast to watch images of Mercury's transit through a reflection from a telescope at The Birla Planetarium in Chennai on May 9, 2016 Astronomers are preparing for one of the highlights of the skywatchers' year, when the Sun, Mercury and Earth all line up -- a phenomenon that happens just a dozen or so times per century. (ARUN SANKAR/AFP/Getty Images)
This article is more than 4 years old.

Mercury, the smallest and first planet in the solar system, is making its way across the face of the Sun on Monday. The planet's transit takes place only 13 or 14 times a century when Mercury comes directly between the Sun and the Earth and is visible as a small black dot with help from special light-filtering telescopes. (Remember, do not stare at the Sun!) Here & Now co-host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Kelly Beatty of Sky and Telescope about the transit's importance and the best ways to watch.

Watch the live stream from NASA or Sky and Telescope.

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This segment aired on May 9, 2016.

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