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Report Finds Evidence Of Widespread Tampering In Russian Doping Scandal03:48
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International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach (L) attends an Olympic summit on June 21, 2016 in Lausanne. For Russia's track and field stars, the meeting of Olympic executives may offer the last chance to compete at the Games in Rio de Janeiro. Last week, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) upheld a ban on Russian athletes, first imposed in November, following revelations of state-sponsored doping and massive corruption riddling the nation's track and field programme. (FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach (L) attends an Olympic summit on June 21, 2016 in Lausanne. For Russia's track and field stars, the meeting of Olympic executives may offer the last chance to compete at the Games in Rio de Janeiro. Last week, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) upheld a ban on Russian athletes, first imposed in November, following revelations of state-sponsored doping and massive corruption riddling the nation's track and field programme. (FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
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A report released this morning by Canadian law professor Richard McLaren confirmed that officials in Russia’s Ministry of Sport, its anti-doping agency, and security services were involved in a scheme to circumvent doping tests of Russian athletes from 2011 to 2015.

Jamie Strashin of the CBC joins Here & Now's Megna Chakrabarti with more on the story.

Guest

Jamie Strashin, sports reporter for the CBC. He tweets @StrashinCBC.

This segment aired on July 18, 2016.

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