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As Baton Rouge Cleans Up From Its Floods, Remembering Hurricane Katrina06:07
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In this handout photo, flooded neighborhoods can be seen as the Coast Guard conducts initial Hurricane Katrina damage assessment overflights Aug. 29, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Kyle Niemi/US Coast Guard via Getty Images)
In this handout photo, flooded neighborhoods can be seen as the Coast Guard conducts initial Hurricane Katrina damage assessment overflights Aug. 29, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Kyle Niemi/US Coast Guard via Getty Images)
This article is more than 4 years old.

The flooding that devastated Baton Rouge Louisiana this month is a grim reminder of the havoc that nature can wreak on residents of the state. Today marks 11 years since Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people and displacing a million others.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Beverly Wright, founder of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice at Dillard University in New Orleans, about that disaster, how the recovery effort has played out and the lessons that were learned as Louisiana residents face another rebuilding effort.

Guest

Beverly Wright, founder of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice at Dillard University in New Orleans. The center tweets @DSCEJ.

This segment aired on August 29, 2016.

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