Coastal Erosion Washing Away Beachfront Community In Washington State04:37
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This will probably be the next in a long series of homes to fall into the sea at Washaway Beach, Washington. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
This will probably be the next in a long series of homes to fall into the sea at Washaway Beach, Washington. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
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Waterfront property owners on opposite sides of the country are grappling this week with how to respond to dramatic coastal erosion.

In northeast Florida, cities, businesses and the state continue to plan how to rebuild beachfront infrastructure lost to Hurricane Matthew.

Meanwhile, along the coast of Washington State, erosion threatens not just homes and a vital highway, but a multi-million dollar cranberry industry. The Pacific Northwest dodged a bullet this weekend when remnants of a typhoon passed further offshore than first predicted.

Still, the erosion in one beachfront community is so rapid, to retreat or fight is in question.

Tom Banse with Here & Now contributor Northwest News Network reports from aptly named Washaway Beach.

Neighborhood lanes terminate in thin air at Washaway Beach. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
Neighborhood lanes terminate in thin air at Washaway Beach. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
Washaway Beach shoreline in 1990. (USGS via Google Maps)
Washaway Beach shoreline in 1990. (USGS via Google Maps)
Washaway Beach aerial view in 2011. Red line marks shoreline in 1990. (Google Maps)
Washaway Beach aerial view in 2011. Red line marks shoreline in 1990. (Google Maps)
People have tied together driftwood and stumps as a makeshift defense to armor the base of the low bank. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
People have tied together driftwood and stumps as a makeshift defense to armor the base of the low bank. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
Cranberry growers David Cottrell and Connie Allen want to see more action to defend the valuable cranberry bogs between Grayland and North Cove, Washington. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
Cranberry growers David Cottrell and Connie Allen want to see more action to defend the valuable cranberry bogs between Grayland and North Cove, Washington. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
Homeowner Tom Burchard -- with his dog Bo -- has an air of resignation about soon losing the waterfront property that he said he picked up cheap. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)
Homeowner Tom Burchard -- with his dog Bo -- has an air of resignation about soon losing the waterfront property that he said he picked up cheap. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)

Reporter

Tom Banse, regional correspondent for Northwest News Network. He tweets @TomBanse.

This segment aired on October 18, 2016.

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