Many Pakistani Kids Must Mix Work With School04:46
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Rizwana Ruab, 16, attends the ninth grade at one of the schools with Developments in Literacy in Orangi. She is studying biology so she can become a police officer. She spends several hours every day making shoes with her family. She earns on average about 20 U.S. cents an hour. (Laura Isensee/Houston Public Media)
Rizwana Ruab, 16, attends the ninth grade at one of the schools with Developments in Literacy in Orangi. She is studying biology so she can become a police officer. She spends several hours every day making shoes with her family. She earns on average about 20 U.S. cents an hour. (Laura Isensee/Houston Public Media)
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In Pakistan, more than 20 million children between the ages of 5 and 16 don’t attend school.

One reason is the quality of many government-run schools. Another reason: they can’t easily pay for privately run schools. So for many families, that means children have to work demanding jobs in order to afford going to school for even part of the day.

Laura Isensee (@lauraisensee) from Here & Now contributor Houston Public Media recently visited Pakistan and has part two of our report.

This segment aired on January 13, 2017.

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