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Mexico State Governor's Race Seen As Referendum On Ruling Party03:47
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Presidential hopeful and two-time candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, left, speaks to Delfina Gomez, who is running for Mexico state governor with his National Regeneration Movement, or MORENA, under a banner reading in Spanish "We are going to win," at a campaign rally in Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico state, Sunday, May 28, 2017. MORENA is attempting to unseat the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI, in June 4 gubernatorial elections in the state, one of the PRI's last remaining strongholds, where it has governed for 88 years. (Rebecca Blackwell/AP)
Presidential hopeful and two-time candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, left, speaks to Delfina Gomez, who is running for Mexico state governor with his National Regeneration Movement, or MORENA, under a banner reading in Spanish "We are going to win," at a campaign rally in Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico state, Sunday, May 28, 2017. MORENA is attempting to unseat the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI, in June 4 gubernatorial elections in the state, one of the PRI's last remaining strongholds, where it has governed for 88 years. (Rebecca Blackwell/AP)
This article is more than 4 years old.

The race for governor of Mexico state, the most populous and important in the country, will be decided in a vote Sunday. Amid accusations of vote buying and fraud, all candidates say they will crack down on corruption and violence. But the electorate is wary and weary.

NPR international correspondent Carrie Kahn (@ckahn) hears what voters are saying about the race, which is seen as a bellwether for next year's presidential vote.

This segment aired on June 2, 2017.

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