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At U.S. National Park Site, A Push To Acknowledge Nagasaki's Dead05:26
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The Roman Catholic Church of Urakami stands out over the burn-razed cityscape of Nagasaki, in 1945, after the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the U.S. over the Japanese industrial center. (AP)
The Roman Catholic Church of Urakami stands out over the burn-razed cityscape of Nagasaki, in 1945, after the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the U.S. over the Japanese industrial center. (AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

Seventy-two years ago today, the U.S. military dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese port city of Nagasaki. More than 75,000 people died, but their stories are largely left out of the retelling of the bomb's history in the United States.

Here & Now's Robin Young talks with Seattle Times reporter Hal Bernton (@hbernton) about a push to explain the darker side of the bomb's legacy at a new national park in Washington state, where the plutonium for the Nagasaki bomb was produced.

This segment aired on August 9, 2017.

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