'Years Of Neglect' To Blame For Water Crisis In Rural Kentucky, State Rep. Says09:49
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This 2000 file photo shows the remains of a Martin County Coal sediment pond that collapsed near Inez, Ky. The release turned sections of the Tug Fork and the Big Sandy rivers black and forced officials to seek alternative sources of water for thousands of residents. Drinking water problems continue today as the water district struggles to update aging infrastructure. (Bob Bird/AP)
This 2000 file photo shows the remains of a Martin County Coal sediment pond that collapsed near Inez, Ky. The release turned sections of the Tug Fork and the Big Sandy rivers black and forced officials to seek alternative sources of water for thousands of residents. Drinking water problems continue today as the water district struggles to update aging infrastructure. (Bob Bird/AP)

Residents of rural Martin County, Kentucky, have been struggling with water issues for years. Videos posted online show yellow water flowing out of the tap, and now some state lawmakers are calling on Republican Gov. Matt Bevin to declare a state of emergency. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Chris Harris (@RepHarrisKy), a Democrat who represents Martin County and part of neighboring Pike County, Kentucky, in the state's general assembly.

This segment aired on May 31, 2019.

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