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Effort Underway To Vaccinate More Native Communities Against COVID-1906:23
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Dr. Lyle Ignace, a member of the Menominee and Coeur D'Alene tribes, became one of the first Native people in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to receive the Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine. (Courtesy)
Dr. Lyle Ignace, a member of the Menominee and Coeur D'Alene tribes, became one of the first Native people in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to receive the Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine. (Courtesy)
This article is more than 1 year old.

COVID-19 data on Native Americans show that they're twice as likely to die from the virus than white Americans. An effort is underway to get more Native communities vaccinated against the coronavirus.

Dr. Lyle Ignace, a member of the Menominee and Coeur D'Alene tribes, rolled up his sleeve and became one of the first Native people in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to receive the Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine.

This segment aired on January 4, 2021.

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