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After 17 Years Underground, Brood X Cicadas Return For 'Romance In The Treetops'05:41
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An adult cicada spotted in Washington, D.C., on May 6, 2021. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)
An adult cicada spotted in Washington, D.C., on May 6, 2021. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)

After spending 17 years sucking on tree roots underground, the largest brood of cicadas in the U.S. — Brood X — is out and about. The beady-eyed insects, no bigger than a thumb, are now engaged in a massive mating ritual in treetops across the eastern part of the country.

Here & Now's Alexander Tuerk heads out with University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp on a cicada safari.

University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp pictured with a cicada on his forehead. (Alexander Tuerk/Here & Now)
University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp pictured with a cicada on his forehead. (Alexander Tuerk/Here & Now)

This segment aired on May 26, 2021.

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Alexander Tuerk Twitter Associate Producer, Here & Now
Alexander Tuerk is a freelance associate producer for Here & Now.

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