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What Russia's attack on Ukraine means for security in Europe05:35
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People board a Kiev bound train in Kostiantynivka, the Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. Russia launched a wide-ranging attack on Ukraine on Thursday, hitting cities and bases with airstrikes or shelling, as civilians piled into trains and cars to flee. (Vadim Ghirda/AP)
People board a Kiev bound train in Kostiantynivka, the Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. Russia launched a wide-ranging attack on Ukraine on Thursday, hitting cities and bases with airstrikes or shelling, as civilians piled into trains and cars to flee. (Vadim Ghirda/AP)

NATO secretary-general Jens Stoltenberg called Russia's attack on Ukraine "a deliberate, cold-blooded and long-planned invasion” and accused Russia of "using force to try to rewrite history.”

Ukraine's government reported airstrikes in several cities and Russian tanks and troops rolling across the border.

Here & Now's Eric Westervelt speaks with Constanze Stelzenmüller, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

This segment aired on February 24, 2022.

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